Case Management Services

Case Management Services

Case Management in a mental health setting can be defined as the coordination of community-based services by a professional or team to support mental health treatment and decrease barriers of the individual for optimal treatment outcomes. Case management is tailored to the individual’s specific biopsychosocial needs ranging from transportation, food, clothing, healthcare, housing, employment assistance services, and facilitating linkage between community agencies and local services with the individual.

Emerald Therapy Center LLC is pleased to now offer case management services at both our Paducah and Murray locations.

We are excited to welcome Chelsea Rollins and Cassie Sengenberger to our team. Chelsea Rollins has over 5 years of experience in Comprehensive and Targeted Case Management. Cassie Sengenberger has experience in case management for both inpatient and outpatient services. They look forward to assisting individuals with a holistic approach to meet their needs to function at their highest level emotionally, physically, spiritually, and financially.  

Suicide Prevention & Awareness: What To Do If You Are The Parent or Friend of Someone Who is Talking About Suicide by Leslie Faulkner

Suicide Prevention & Awareness: What To Do If You Are The Parent or Friend of Someone Who is Talking About Suicide

By Leslie Faulkner, LPCA

So far in this series, we have discussed the risk factors and warning signs of someone who is thinking about suicide. What if someone you love starts talking to you about their suicidal thoughts? This can feel like an overwhelming responsibility, but there are ways to intervene. The chances are that if someone is confiding in you with such powerful thoughts, they trust you. It is important to remain non-judgmental. Someone who is suicidal may feel that death is their only escape, and their judgment at this time is clouded by these intense thoughts and feelings. Be willing to listen, validate how they are feeling, and allow them to express exactly how they are feeling at that moment. Show your support and interest in what they are going through and try your best to remain direct and matter of fact. You are the strong support system in their lives and remaining calm will comfort them.

Another vital plan-of-action for you is to remove any means of suicide, such as weapons, pills, sharp objects, etc. If your loved one has talked to you about their plan for suicide, take them seriously and remove anything that could assist them in their thoughts. Contact a Lifeline Center (1-800-8255) or local hospital for available resources in your area.

A great resource for communicating with someone who may be suicidal is to use the 5 Action Steps (Ask, Keep Them Safe, Be There, Help Them Connect, Follow up). You can access the 5 Steps at:

https://www.bethe1to.com/bethe1to-steps-evidence/

One more important thing to remember during this time is to take care of yourself. It is an emotional time when someone you love and care about admits that they are thinking about suicide. Remember to check in with your own thoughts and feelings. Reach out for help and support for yourself, if needed.

https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/help-someone-else/

About the Author: Leslie Faulkner is a Licensed Professional Counseling Associate (LPCA) at Emerald Therapy Center. She received her Masters of Education in Counseling and Human Development from Lindsay Wilson College. She is currently Director of Children’s Services. She works primarily with children and adolescents.

Teen Suicide: A Better Understanding & Seeking Prevention by Miranda Farthing

Teen Suicide: A Better Understanding and Seeking Prevention

By Miranda Farthing, LPCA

Suicide is not a simple subject to talk (or write about), there is a special difference in the weight of the subject when adding “teen”, “child”, or “adolescent” in front of the word “suicide”. It isn’t easy to listen to either, if you are a parent, a sibling, relative, or friend of the child who is suicidal.

According to Betsy Kennard, Psy. D. from Dallas TX wrote; Nationally, rates of suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, and self-harm have more than doubled, up from less than half a percent in 2008 to 2 percent in 2015. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2016, suicide became the second-leading cause of death in individuals age 10 to 24 years. As of 2019, suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death among teens according. Considering the 4 year discrepancy between 2016 and 2019 and the increasing population of millions of teens in the U.S., I’d say going from the 2nd leading cause of death to the 3rd is a praise-worthy improvement we can be grateful for and continue to build on.

The first thing to understand when it comes to suicide is that it’s always about having a lost sense of hope; i.e, it’s about being in pain that you cannot escape, and their brain is searching for ways end such pain. Someone must introduce new ways and ideas to alleviate the pain they are experiencing and reinspire hope. This is always a collaborative effort on the part of the family, friends, and your counselor. Parents of the suicidal child, it would be wise for you to go to counseling as well as you move through this change with your child. Parents, friends, teachers – by simply taking an interest, humbling yourself to inquire with genuine and kind concern as to why the child is in the pain they are is incredibly helpful. Often times the matter is so complex that they cannot simply tell you why, but it will mean a great deal that you took the time to stop and take an interest to carry what they could give you of their burden and to listen to their pain, even if it means just giving them a safe space to cry, and an opportunity to be heard – even when they aren’t ready to talk.

Some things to keep in mind:

– Please keep in mind and extend grace that is needed towards the child as they are in pain, and people in pain will sometimes respond in congruence to their hurt.

– Suicide always begins with the thought, often the child will rehearse methods of killing themselves, much like practice. They may talk about it to their friends and family in subtle ways to get a feel for how much they actually care, will their care be sustained, who is paying attention, who is listening, who do they feel like they matter to. Feeling like you matter is often the reason you run with friends/crowds you choose.

– Causes for suicidal ideation likely are a combination of stress, fear, doubt, and pressures combined with normal developmental changes they struggle with, in addition to changes in places they found safety in such as divorced families, siblings moving out, or moving to a new community, other losses or griefs. Other issues may also contribute that the child may feel too ashamed or fearful to share or seek help for, leading to the search for a way out of the stuck they find themselves suddenly in their life.

– Teens are more at risk for suicide if they act on impulsive/risky behaviors, have mental or substance abuse problems, undesirable life events such as being bullied or recent losses occur, such as the death of a parent, family history of mental or substance abuse problems or suicide. If there is violence in the family, physically, sexually, verbally, or emotionally. If there are weapons not respectfully locked up in the home. Children are also incredibly impressionable and searching for themselves at this age, thus, exposure to the suicidal behavior of others, such as family or peers, in the news, or in fiction stories can increase a child’s risk. This is not to say a child needs to be sheltered from the realities of the world.

– It is important appropriately teach the seriousness of the darker experiences of the world, and how to balance these difficulties they will face in life with the positive, brighter realities they will experience and sometimes earn and enjoy in life.

Warning Signs:

  • Withdrawal from family/friends/things they normally enjoy.
  • Depression/Anxiety
  • Change in sleep patterns or appetite for a period of time.
  • Acting out, risky/impulsive behaviors, drug/alcohol abuse.
  • Obsession with death/dying, neglecting their own self-care.
  • Physical complaints – stomachaches, muscle aches, headaches, fatigue.
  • Loss of interest in work/schoolwork, people. Lack of response to praise.
  • Feeling or stating they wish to die.
  • Says “I want to kill myself,” or “I’m going to commit suicide.”
  • Gives verbal hints, “I won’t be a problem much longer,”/“If anything happens to me, I want you to know ….”
  • Gives away or throws away favorite or important personal belongings
  • Becomes suddenly cheerful after being depressed
  • May express strange thoughts
  • Writes 1 or more suicide notes

If your child is suicidal:

It is very important that they be evaluated by a mental health professional. Teen suicide is always a cry for help, and should be taken very seriously. If a child expresses suicidal ideation or is actively suicidal, do not leave that child alone, remove anything that they could use to harm themselves, especially in the home. Whoever you are (friend, teacher, mental health professional), if you even suspect suicidal ideation, you must tell legal guardian or someone who can help you help the suicidal person/child.

Next, take the child to be evaluated by a mental health professional and begin treatment. It is highly recommended that they have a physical examination by their physician to rule out any medical causes or influences. Depending on the severity and reasoning for suicidal thoughts, treatment may include medical and mental health therapies, or hospitalization in a behavioral health unit until client is stabilized and can continue outpatient treatment with a Counselor. Often, when a child is suicidal Counselors often recommend inpatient care until stabilized and/or initiate a tridactic level of care, which includes seeing the counselor 2-3x per week, and making an appointment with their physician and a psychiatrist to ensure best level of care, quickly. The counselor encourages openness and non judgemental communication between parent and child, because active parental involvement is vital to successful outcomes in mental health. A safety plan is planned out with the child and therapist where they list 3 people whom they trust they can reach out to if they feel suicidal, and the therapist gives them the National Suicide Hotline number, and with their signatures the client agrees to work at any means necessary to stay alive and work through this time with the therapist, and the therapist signs to agree to help the client. I often work on the safety plan with the client, and talk extensively with the client to find motivation for the present and hope for the future. In the moment it isn’t always about the way as much as it is finding the light at the end of the tunnel to anchor ourselves to so we can then reach back and work through whatever is happening in the past or present that needs to change.

Prevention:

To prevent teen suicide, pay very close attention to your child.
– Listen to the deeper reasons for their complaints and frustrations, learn about who they are, reinforce their strengths and ambitions, encourage and participate with them in memorable moments and regular, healthy, self-care routines.
– Read and learn about suicide warning signs and prevention.
– Maintain your relationship and open communication with your child/friend/student.
– Listen to understand and be supportive, without undue criticism.

 

About the Author: Miranda Farthing is a Licensed Professional Counseling Associate (LPCA). She obtained her Bachelor’s in Psychology, her Master’s of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling, and Ed.S in Professional School Counseling at Harding University in Searcy, Arkansas. Miranda works as a School Based Therapist and Clinician for Emerald Therapy Center LLC. 

Fostering Resilience By Miranda Farthing & Leslie Faulkner

Fostering Resilience: Facts About Suicide and What You Can Do

By Leslie Faulkner (LPCA) and Miranda Farthing (LPCA)

As of June 2018, suicide has been the 10th leading cause of death in the US, and its rate continues to increase each year. It is so important that we all learn the risk factors and warning signs for suicide in order to spread awareness and prevention. Previous suicide attempts, a history of suicide in the family, substance misuse, mood disorders, tragic losses, history of trauma, and access to lethal means are just some examples of events that may increase the risk for suicide. The CDC has reported that relationship problems are among the top risk factors for suicide, followed by crisis or substance use. Warning signs of suicide may include reckless behavior, drastic changes in mood, increased substance abuse, social withdrawal, and often talking about death. 

As a Licensed Professional Counseling Associate, it is imperative that I help a suicidal client identify their protective factors, or the client’s reasons for living. Common protective factors may include effective mental health treatment, strong social support, fear of death, and follow-up calls from providers. If you have a loved one who you feel is struggling with suicidal thoughts, always make sure to keep them safe and help them feel as connected as possible. Provide them the ongoing support, assess their home for lethal means to keep them safe, refer them for treatment, and, most importantly, listen to their needs.

Recently, the FCC has approved a plan to initiate a 3-Digit Suicide Prevention Number (988). If you or someone you love is struggling, keep in mind the risk factors and warning signs for suicide, and know that there is always help available.

Reach out to your closest relatives, friends, or seek professional help from a mental health counselor or therapist. You are invited to follow this suicide prevention and awareness three part series. Within this series we will address teen suicide; stats and prevention, what you can do if you are a parent/friend/third party of someone who is talking about suicide, and self-care; mental health first aid and what you can do to prevent mental illness and increase resilience in your own life.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (Available 24/7): 1-800-273-8255

About the Authors: Leslie Faulkner and Miranda Farthing are both Licensed Professional Counseling Associates with Emerald Therapy Center, LLC. 

 

Pets & Mental Health by Leslie Faulkner


“Happiness is a warm puppy.” – Charles M. Schulz

Unless, of course, you’re more of a cat person.

In my short 30 years of life, I have concluded that dog really is man’s best friend. Through personal experience, as well as my educational background in Psychology and Counseling & Human Development, I have learned that animal companionship can serve as a therapeutic outlet for anxiety, depression, and stress. Studies have shown that pet owners are less likely to suffer from depression than those without pets. Not only that, but it has also been concluded that pets can help their owners regulate their blood pressure in stressful situations. The love and quality time we spend with our pets can also increase our serotonin and dopamine (AKA, our “Happy Chemicals”) levels. Studies have also shown that having a pet can lower cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, and chances of a heart attack. Most pet owners, especially dog owners, are more prone to exercise due to having a furry companion by their side. All pets, big or small, serve as a great therapeutic outlet for our everyday stressors. Personally, my dogs are part of the family, as well as my personal assistant to living a happy and healthy life!

Pictured here is one of my three fur babies. Her name is Padme (yes, a Star Wars reference), and she has helped me tremendously with driving anxiety.

About the Author: Leslie Faulkner is a Licensed Professional Counseling Associate (LPCA) at Emerald Therapy Center. She received her Masters of Education in Counseling and Human Development from Lindsay Wilson College.  She is currently Director of Children’s Services. Leslie works primarily with children and adolescents, and is also a Behavioral Health Consultant for Head Start classrooms.

Poverty & Addiction by Lisa Frost

Addiction knows no financial balance and affects individuals of all socioeconomic classes. However, there is a strong correlation between poverty and substance use disorders. Individuals in low income and rural areas in many cases struggle to meet their basic needs for housing, food, and gainful employment. As these stresses increase individuals may view selling illicit substances as a way to advance financially and also escape emotionally.

If we look at wages in low income areas, housing is normally near $700.00 per month in rent. Most landlords require the first months rent in advance so $1400.00 would need to be paid upfront just to achieve shelter. Then there are utility bills and renters insurance. An individual making $10.00 per hour that works a 40 hour work week bring home pay is around $340.00 per week after taxes. This equals to $1360.00 in monthly income. With these numbers a single individual would be $40.00 per month short just to achieve basic housing. This does not include groceries, transportation to and from work, or child care expenses if the individual has dependents.

In this situation those struggling to meet basic needs are met with desperation and the absence of hope. This may lead to impulsive decisions and behaviors that the person may not normally engage in to meet their basic needs. While we cannot change the individuals circumstances, we as counselors can offer assistance for resources for community based services, rental or housing assistance information, and information for local food pantries. The truth is, if we look around our local areas its not hard to find individuals that are struggling in our communities. By offering resources and healthy interventions, it provides those in need with hope and motivation for positive change. Developing a list of resources and reaching out to those in need of referrals for assistance allows individuals to network and create healthy alliances for positive change.

About the Author: Lisa Frost is a Licensed Professional Counseling Associate that has obtained an Ed.S. In Mental Health Counseling degree from Murray State University. Ms. Frost is currently under the clinical supervision of Dr. Justin Brogan. Lisa has additional education in the areas of addiction and substance use disorders as well as trauma informed care, anger management, and domestic violence counseling practices. Lisa is currently employed with Emerald Counseling Center as an outpatient Mental Health Counselor who specializes in addiction and substance abuse counseling in addition to providing general mental health counseling. Lisa grew up near the Murray area in rural western Kentucky. She enjoys riding and rehabilitating horses and spending time with her children. 

The Language of Addiction By Lisa Frost

In large part the way that we address addiction in our community can be the difference between whether or not an individual seeks treatment services. Individuals that struggle with addiction in may continue to use illicit substances because they are trapped in a cycle of shame and guilt. How we speak to those struggling and the language that we use can be the difference between life and death for that individual. For example a person who is labelled as a meth addict, heroin addict, or alcoholic may feel unloved and unworthy and be less likely to seek assistance. We don’t label those struggling with cancer or heart disease as heart disease or cancer. Instead we see them as a person and an individual that needs help, love, support, and treatment in order to heal and become healthy. 

Individuals struggling with addiction aren’t struggling with a moral issue. They are struggling with a disease and they need help and support to regain health, wellness, and balance in a life that has become chaotic and unmanageable. Individuals struggling with addiction and their families require assistance and support from friends, neighbors, and community members in order to gain recovery. This assistance may take the form of inpatient treatment, detox services, intensive outpatient counseling, family counseling, and community support groups. Those who struggle with addiction and their families need support and less stigma when reaching out for help and services. By being empathetic to the needs of these individuals and their families, we can make a positive change in our communities and also in our culture regarding addiction and addiction treatment services. 

 

About the Author: Lisa Frost is a Licensed Professional Counseling Associate that has obtained an Ed.S. In Mental Health Counseling degree from Murray State University. Ms. Frost is currently under the clinical supervision of Dr. Justin Brogan. Lisa has additional education in the areas of addiction and substance use disorders as well as trauma informed care, anger management, and domestic violence counseling practices. Lisa is currently employed with Emerald Counseling Center as an outpatient Mental Health Counselor who specializes in addiction and substance abuse counseling in addition to providing general mental health counseling. Lisa grew up near the Murray area in rural western Kentucky. She enjoys riding and rehabilitating horses and spending time with her children. 

Gratitude, By Mark Hurt

This week is Thanksgiving, my favorite holiday of the year. It doesn’t seem to be too over-commercialized yet, and is usually a day of family and friends and food. The purpose behind the holiday, going back to it’s official proclamation by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, is gratitude. 

Two of the Four Foundations of Wellness that we at Emerald try to implement with all our clients are Emotional and Spiritual. Both of these involve gratitude. To cultivate emotional wellness, I need to learn to be grateful instead of resentful or cynical. To cultivate spiritual wellness, I need to learn to be thankful instead of restless or discontented. I remember, early in my sobriety, when a friend and mentor suggested I make a “gratitude list,” and keep it where I could always have access to it. At first, I thought it was a silly exercise. But to this day, I have that list, and it gets refreshed from time to time as circumstances in my life change. Many of us do not have to be reminded of how blessed we are. I am thankful and grateful each day for the opportunities that continue to unfold in my own life. 

There is a flip side though. Not everyone is at the point of being able to see the positive in life. Not everyone is able to discard old feelings of hurt, anger, jealousy, and resentment. For some, life is out to get them, and there’s nothing just nothing good under the sun. Not everyone will enjoy good food, good family, or good friends during the holidays. For some, the holidays are among the most depressing seasons of the year. For those who realize how blessed we are, let’s do something for someone else this Thanksgiving season, and try not to get caught. 

Do an act of kindness for another. Help feed a family. Let’s not just express our thanks and our gratitude in thoughts and words, let’s express our thanks and gratitude through acts of service to others. 

Happy Thanksgiving!

About the Author: Mark Hurt transitioned from 30 years in pastoral ministry into counseling, with a special interest in addiction and recovery related problems for children, youth, and adults. He is also interested in helping men and couples with relationship issues, as well as those dealing with religious trauma. In his spare time, Mark enjoys playing golf and tennis, reading books about spiritual development, and doing just about anything with any of his 6 grandchildren. His wife, Crystal, is a Pediatric Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit nurse at LeBonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, TN. Mark was educated at Freed-Hardeman University and Harding School of Theology. He is available for appointments at Emerald Therapy Center LLC at both of our Murray, KY and Paducah, KY locations.

Professionalism in Private Practice by Ebone’ Ross

At Emerald Therapy Center, we strive for the best possible working conditions for its employees. Part of this commitment is encouraging an open and frank atmosphere in which any problem, complaint, suggestion, or question receives a timely response. Our Executive Director, Shelly Baer, has modeled and encouraged an atmosphere of workplace etiquette with grace and humility.

When I began working for Emerald, I began the grooming process and transition from state/community social service agencies to private practice. In a team driven private practice, we strive to share the best practices through change, integrity, trust, savvy, humility, and meaningful interactions. 

Developing trust and productive relationships with families, schools, organizations and our overall clientele is very important. The setting of our offices are designed to be warm, welcoming, and relaxing. You may hear the soothing sounds of zen and relaxation music or some upbeat groovy tunes. Essential oils are usually diffusing, and coffee is often times brewing. When we are in the community, we want to remember the interaction by going a little more beyond the traditional hello. We value kindness, compassion and genuine relationships. Our most appreciated connection is our commitment to provide equal opportunity to all those we employ or utilize in service delivery.  

Our mission embodies four areas of wellness (Emotional, Physical, Spiritual, and Financial) to help clients function at their highest level. We promote that counseling, therapy and life coaching should be uplifting and encouraging. We want our clients to leave our facility feeling better than when they came in, regardless of the issue. Within that mission, Emerald Therapy Center prides ourselves on the ability to customize your experience, relationships and interactions to continue and maintain confidence and trust within our agency. 

 

About the Author: Ebone’ Ross graduated from Murray State University in December 2012 with a Masters Degree with an emphasis in Counseling. She has training in advocacy, mental health, domestic violence and substance abuse. Ebone’ has worked with a variety of ages and populations, from young children with behavioral issues to teens struggling with substance use and traumatic experiences, as well as with adults and families in crisis.  She currently serves as the Board Chair for the Paducah Red Cross chapter. In her free time, she is a motivational speaker for her business Empowering Elevation. She lives in Paducah, KY with her husband and two children.

Emerald Therapy Center LLC

Emerald Therapy Center LLC is headquartered in Paducah, KY and was established with the goal of providing exceptional mental health services to the Purchase region. Emerald has grown and expanded our services to fit the needs of the communities that we now serve. We provide therapy, counseling, and life coaching in our Paducah home office, as well as our new location in Murray, KY. 

Our staff have extensive experience helping people in our community address a range of issues that they are struggling with. We are able to provide services such as individual counseling sessions, support groups, education classes, life coaching and retreats throughout the region. Our mission is to help our clients function at their highest level. 

At Emerald, there isn’t a one-size fits all approach to therapy because we are able to adapt to your specific needs and goals. We know that your best days are ahead, and we want to help you along the path to get there. Through this blog, we intend to share focus articles based on the four foundations of wellness which are emotional, physical, spiritual, and financial. These four foundations are the heart of our practice. 

Suicide Prevention & Awareness: What To Do If You Are The Parent or Friend of Someone Who is Talking About Suicide by Leslie Faulkner

Suicide Prevention & Awareness: What To Do If You Are The Parent or Friend of Someone Who is Talking About Suicide By Leslie Faulkner, LPCA So far in this series, we have discussed the risk factors and warning signs of someone who is thinking about suicide. What...

Teen Suicide: A Better Understanding & Seeking Prevention by Miranda Farthing

Teen Suicide: A Better Understanding and Seeking Prevention By Miranda Farthing, LPCA Suicide is not a simple subject to talk (or write about), there is a special difference in the weight of the subject when adding “teen”, “child”, or “adolescent” in front of the word...

Fostering Resilience By Miranda Farthing & Leslie Faulkner

Fostering Resilience: Facts About Suicide and What You Can Do By Leslie Faulkner (LPCA) and Miranda Farthing (LPCA) As of June 2018, suicide has been the 10th leading cause of death in the US, and its rate continues to increase each year. It is so important that we...